MBCLC Endorsements for November 2020 Election

PDF of Nov 2020 Endorsements

Sisters and Brothers,

No matter where we come from or what we look like, we all deserve an equitable chance to pursue our dreams. As a labor movement, we come together to reject the politics of hate and division. We are fighting back against self-interested politicians and greedy corporations who try to divide us while they hijack our economy, our democracy, and our government.

The need for union activism grows as more and more working people slip into debt and poverty, fail to maintain the same standard of living as their parents, and face an ever-widening gap between rich and poor.

Along with my union Sisters & Brothers, we have gained a voice to be heard in the streets, in the workplace, and in the halls of government. Such access was, at one time, reserved for the privileged few for whom doors opened based on their fortune, family history, and network of connections. Unions begin to level the playing field so that worker and family concerns are taken into account.

Union members count on elected officials to be fully conscious of the human cost and benefit of every decision that comes before them.  At their best, they carry forward the hopes and aspirations of working Americans; support for union concerns by candidates for public office is in the public interest!

When a union supports campaigns advocating for public policy, it is based on the voices of union members who pull together across diverse backgrounds, viewpoints, and resources and democratically choose the candidates we believe we can endorse to carry our priorities forward.

Sisters and brothers, below you will find a list of our endorsed candidates for this election cycle*.

--- Cesar Lara, Executive Director

PDF of Nov 2020 Endorsements

The AFL-CIO Executive Council today elected Liz Shuler, a visionary leader and longtime trade unionist, to serve as president of the federation of 56 unions and 12.5 million members. Shuler is the first woman to hold the office in the history of the labor federation. The Executive Council also elected United Steelworkers (USW) International Vice President Fred Redmond to succeed Shuler as secretary-treasurer, the first African American to hold the number two office. Tefere Gebre will continue as executive vice president, rounding out the most diverse team of officers ever to lead the AFL-CIO.

Our brother and leader Richard Trumka passed away on August 5, 2021, at the age of 72.

2020’s growth in pay inequity between workers and CEOs confirms the “executive base salary reductions” touted during the COVID-19 crisis were just lip service, per this year’s AFL-CIO Executive Pay

The AFL-CIO, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Sindicato Nacional Independiente de Trabajadores de Industrias y de Servicios Movimiento 20/32 (SNITIS) and Public Citizen announced Monday that they have filed the first complaint under the Rapid Response Mechanism of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) against Tridonex, an auto parts factory located in Matamoros in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

As President Biden addressed a joint session of Congress recently, he highlighted a fundamental truth about his American Jobs Plan.

For once, our leaders aren’t pushing another tax break for the elite, bailing out the ultra-wealthy or preaching the false gospel of trickle-down economics. As the president put it, this is “a once-in-a-generation investment in America itself.”

Billionaire Elon Musk is slated to host Saturday Night Live this weekend, and AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler (IBEW) is calling his infamous labor practices and anti-union tactics anything but funny. “Musk has used his social-media megaphone to spread misinformation about COVID-19, endanger employees’ health and violate their organizing rights.

The PRO Act is about as important a piece of labor legislation as we’ve seen in some time. It holds the potential to open the door for workers and organizers to step up and reverse 40 years of losses for organized labor. The law, whose initials stand for Protecting the Right to Organize, aims to do just that: protect workers from being harassed or fired if they try to organize a union or if they try to help their already existing union become more active in their workplace. This is seen as the number one legislative priority for organized labor.

Before we even find out if Elon Musk can do comedy, we know this: Letting him host “Saturday Night Live” is a joke.

In 2019, 5,333 working people were killed on the job and an estimated 95,000 died from occupational diseases, according to the 30th edition of Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect report released today. That means every day, on average, 275 U.S. workers die from hazardous working conditions. And this was before the devastating COVID-19 pandemic that has been responsible for far too many worker infections and deaths in our country.

The U.S. Senate should pass the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, five human rights and labor groups said today in releasing a question-and-answer document about the issue. The groups—including Human Rights Watch, the AFL-CIO, Amnesty International USA, the Economic Policy Institute and the National Employment Law Project—called on senators to seize this once-in-a-generation opportunity to tackle rampant economic inequality by empowering workers and building a more just and human rights-based economy.

Few presidents in America’s history have demonstrated a higher commitment to the labor movement than President Biden. “The truth is I’m a union president, and I make no bones about that,” he said on Saturday. “I’m committed to strengthening our unions and rebuilding the backbone of this country—the middle class.” Biden sat down with a UAW local president and talked about his administration’s policies to promote American manufacturing.