MBCLC Endorsements for November 2020 Election

PDF of Nov 2020 Endorsements

Sisters and Brothers,

No matter where we come from or what we look like, we all deserve an equitable chance to pursue our dreams. As a labor movement, we come together to reject the politics of hate and division. We are fighting back against self-interested politicians and greedy corporations who try to divide us while they hijack our economy, our democracy, and our government.

The need for union activism grows as more and more working people slip into debt and poverty, fail to maintain the same standard of living as their parents, and face an ever-widening gap between rich and poor.

Along with my union Sisters & Brothers, we have gained a voice to be heard in the streets, in the workplace, and in the halls of government. Such access was, at one time, reserved for the privileged few for whom doors opened based on their fortune, family history, and network of connections. Unions begin to level the playing field so that worker and family concerns are taken into account.

Union members count on elected officials to be fully conscious of the human cost and benefit of every decision that comes before them.  At their best, they carry forward the hopes and aspirations of working Americans; support for union concerns by candidates for public office is in the public interest!

When a union supports campaigns advocating for public policy, it is based on the voices of union members who pull together across diverse backgrounds, viewpoints, and resources and democratically choose the candidates we believe we can endorse to carry our priorities forward.

Sisters and brothers, below you will find a list of our endorsed candidates for this election cycle*.

--- Cesar Lara, Executive Director

PDF of Nov 2020 Endorsements

John Sweeney, who led an era of transformative change in America’s labor movement, passed away Feb. 1 at the age of 86.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka discusses why America needs a strong labor movement and how the Biden administration is committed to strengthening unions.

This past fall, Transport Workers Union (TWU) member Gregory Harasym began a master’s program in city and regional planning with a concentration in transportation. He intends to examine alternative transportation methods to address community-level health and social injustices; and he hopes to eventually be a specialist in this field, focusing on policy for the Department of Transportation. His career direction changed in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which deeply impacted his community and left him passionate about helping communities become resilient to future disasters.

Transportation industry groups and unions were quick to applaud the selection of Pete Buttigieg as President-elect Joe Biden’s nomine

“Katherine Tai’s nomination signals a stark departure from the failed practices of the past.”

Tai played a key role in shaping the United States Mexico Canada Agreement — which the AFL-CIO endorsed — as the top trade counsel for the House Ways and Means committee, and previously headed the USTR legal team on China issues.

Tony Lein, a member of the Fire Fighters (IAFF) Local 95 in Chicago, is among the 2020 Union Plus Scholarship award winners. He is a firefighter/paramedic and peer fitness trainer with the Oak Park [Illinois] Fire Department, where he has worked since 2015. He also teaches American Heart Association CPR classes with Save-A-Life. Lein was awarded a $4,000 scholarship as he pursues a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling.

The United States has the sad distinction of having the most confirmed coronavirus cases and death in the world, which has kept many schools shuttered for instruction in person. Parents and educators know that our children do best at schools, where they can get support, and they worry that the lack of learning in person has hurt students in need.

Larry Willis’s colleagues liked to joke that he kept a copy of the Railway Labor Act, passed a few years before the Great Depression, under his pillow.

“He loved the wonk,” said his wife, Amy York. “He could explain things in a way that normal people could understand.”

“It’s absolutely essential,” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said in an interview. “If you tell a worker, ‘Don’t come to work when you’re sick so you don’t spread Covid, but you’re not going to get paid and your family’s not going to eat and you’re not going to pay your rent,’ you’re asking too much of them.”

Read the full article in Politico.

California has become the fourth and largest state to adopt emergency workplace protections for COVID-19. Nearly 20 million workers in California will be protected by the new mandate, which includes requirements for face masks, physical distancing and reporting of outbreaks in the workplace. Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health at the AFL-CIO, said the federal government should follow the lead of states like California. “The virus doesn’t know boundaries,” she said.